Mike Boessen's Radio Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2018"

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Crosley 167 Cathedral (1934)

Crosley 167 Cathedral (1934)

Compared to other low budget, depression era, five-tube mini-cathedrals of its day, this little 1934 Crosley 167 is a real stand-out both in looks and performance. The front is very eye-catching, incorporating several types of veneer applied in layers with attractive inlaid features. The overall effect is very beautiful. I think it is one of the prettiest mini cathedrals ever made. This restoration was started by a dear friend who had to retire due to health reasons. I did my best to preserve as much of his work as I could. There are a few minor defects in the finish, but I did not want to strip it and undo all of his beautiful work. The chassis has been completely restored with all new caps and resistors as needed. A full alignment has been done. Receiver sensitivity is quite good and surprising for a little five-tuber. All in all, a very unique and attractive little set. The tube shields in the rear view photo are not Crosley. Proper Crosley tube shields have been installed since the picture was taken. $450.00. (1680014)

 

Detrola 302 Clock Radio (1939)

Detrola 302 Clock Radio (1939)

Check out this highly sought after little Detrola 302 clock radio straight from the motor city. Detrola really knocked it out of the park with this elegant and simple little set. The finish is absolutely stunning on the near-perfect cabinet. Complete chassis rebuild with all new caps and resistors. Full alignment. Reception is fair on the internal antenna but very good with an external antenna. The clock, dial glass, knobs, clock switch, speaker and grille cloth are all replacements. I repaired a couple of cracks in the rear cover but overall it is as good-looking as any. The wood is slightly darker than in these photos. I have added an audio cable for your mobile devices. I feel safe in saying you will not find a nicer looking example of this adorable little gem. 10"W x 10"H x 6"D. $599.00. (1680024)

 

Emerson 28 (1934)

Emerson 28 (1934)

By the mid 30s these Emerson guys were building some really nice radios, of which this model 28 is a very good example. The front is beautifully ornate, and the top is sensuously curved, fairly unique in a tombstone package. The finish on this one was fairly nice, so I prettied it up a little and over coated it with twelve coats of nitrocellulose lacquer, giving it a slick glossy finish. It isn't perfect, but I think it is very attractive. A good set of tubes, new capacitors and resistors as necessary. Full alignment. The original dial is a little grungy, but doesn't look too bad when illuminated. I had to make two of the knobs. I removed the awful front end volume control and replaced it with much better amplifier stage volume control. I am still struggling with photography. This radio looks much nicer in person than in my pictures, and it plays beautifully. It is a gorgeous set that I am sure you will be proud to own. 17"H x 12"W x 8"D. $295.00. (1680025)

 

General Electric GD52 (1938)

General Electric GD52 (1938)

General Electric put a lot of pizzazz into this unique and attractive little GD52 table radio. The cabinet is at once simple in design, and elegant in appearance, with extensive use of very attractive veneer. The GD52 was manufactured in 1938 and is apparently much less common than its younger cousin, the GD60, released in 1939. From what I can tell, none has ever sold on Radio Attic. This one was restored by a previous owner who by and large did a lot of very nice work. An ugly schematic diagram was pasted over the model label on the bottom of the radio. I saved as much of it as I could but it suffered quite a bit from that abuse. The graphics on the volume wheel are badly worn in the first 45° of rotation. I went through the chassis, replaced a few more components, replaced a weak tube, and gave it a full alignment. I have added an audio cable for your mobile devices. This is a very unique and attractive little radio and would be a real eye catcher on your kitchen cabinet or in your collection. 15"W x 9"H x 8"D. $225.00. (1680026)

 

Majestic 310A Tombstone (1932)

Majestic 310A Tombstone (1932)

The brand name is absolutely appropriate for this radio. The effect of the Gothic stained-glass window look on the front of this instrument is nothing short of majestic. This rare beauty was manufactured by the Grigsby-Grunow Company of Chicago in 1932. I think it is one of the most beautiful tombstone radios ever made. I refinished it in the original color with 18 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. I repaired a few chips in the veneer, and a cigarette burn in the top. The knobs, dial, and grille cloth are reproductions. The set had a couple of large aftermarket chassis mounted capacitors in it when I got it. I removed those and put metal plugs in the holes. I replaced all the capacitors and resistors, and gave it a full alignment. Receiver sensitivity is the best I have ever seen in a seven-tube radio. I went to a lot of trouble and expense to find high testing, original Majestic metallized tubes where they were originally used. This is a radio you don't see every day. I hope someone falls in love with it. $500.00. (1680022)

 

Mitchell 1250 "Lullaby" Bed Lamp-Radio (1949)

Mitchell 1250 "Lullaby" Bed Lamp-Radio (1949)

Get a load of this adorable and practical little 1949 Mitchell 1250 Lullaby Bed Lamp-Radio. This thing is absolutely the berries. Mom would just hang this on her bed board and flip on the built-in 25 watt reading lamp while she took in a gripping romance novel. I just barely got my AM loving sweetheart to let me sell it, because it wouldn't fit on our bookcase headboard. The Bakelite cabinet is in wonderful condition. It has all the original hardware and is in nearly like new condition. The restoration was done by my good friend Bill Skaggs in Long Beach, Mississippi. I gave it a thorough check out and cleaning. It plays beautifully and picks up stations quite well on its built in antenna. Little gems like this don't come up every day. Don't get "lulled" to sleep and let it slip away! $175.00. (1680016)

 

Monarch Tombstone

Monarch Tombstone

If you are the kind of person who likes to have something nobody else has, and you don't mind not knowing what it is, this is the radio for you. All I know about this radio is that it says Monarch on the escutcheon. Manufactured by Continental Radio and Television Corporation of Chicago, Illinois, about 1935. The same radio was sold under the Admiral brand as their Continental B600. I bought this radio as part of a collection. It has an amateur restoration done by a previous owner. While it is not up to my standards it isn't too bad, and is all and all an attractive radio. There is one small crack in the speaker grille and a few less then perfect places in the staining work. The dial glass is not original. I put in a full set of good tubes and gave it a full alignment. It plays beautifully and the sound is nothing short of exceptional thanks to a pair of #43 tubes in parallel for the output stage. At 14 inches tall it is smaller than many tombstone radios. If you want to listen to some oldies on your favorite AM station you will be glad you bought this little gem. $175.00. (1680015)

 

Philco 38-14T (1938)

NEW!

Philco 38-14T (1938)

This simple, yet attractive Philco 38-14T mantel radio was recently saved from the landfill by a good friend. I think the stylish wood cabinet with wrap around speaker grille and decorative inlays set it apart from the cheaper, more common Bakelite versions. I completely refinished it with 12 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. There are two or three minor dings in the cabinet, but certainly nothing objectionable. I gave it a full set of good tubes, with all new capacitors and resistors as necessary. I even stuffed new capacitors in the the chassis mounted electrolytics to maintain originality. Reception is decent on broadcast and passable on shortwave. It has a good sized speaker for this type of radio and the sound is quite good. I have installed an audio cable for your mobile devices. All in all, an awesome little radio that doesn't take up much space and won't break the bank. 12"W x 8"H x 6"D. $149.00. (1680029)

 

Philco 60 Cathedral

Philco 60 Cathedral

The end of an era was marked by the production of the 60 series of Philco cathedral. An early version of the last cathedral style Philco model, this beautifully restored example was produced about 1934. I restored the cabinet to a gorgeous, glossy Walnut finish with 15 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. The chassis has been completely rebuilt with all new caps and resistors, and a full alignment. A few minor repairs to the veneer, and a reproduction dial. The sound is outstanding, and the appearance striking. A radio you will be proud to add to your collection. $350.00. (1680013)

 

Philco 66S Tombstone (1935)

Philco 66S Tombstone (1935)

The last of the 66 series, this very nice example of the Philco 66S is much harder to find than its more common older siblings. This one is a veteran of a previous restoration, and has a few minor mars and dings. I touched up the finish and put eight coats of lacquer over it. The result is a really quite attractive radio. Photographing these old radios is very difficult. The actual color is a little darker than what shows in these photos. All new capacitors, resistors as necessary, and a very good set of tubes have been installed for years of trouble-free service. Full alignment. The grille cloth and dial have been replaced. Unlike most five-tube radios, the shortwave is really quite good on this set. The speaker is perfect and the sound is outstanding. If you're a Philco collector I'm willing to bet you don't have one of these and I hope you will take a liking to this little gem. $325.00. (1680021)

 

Philco 89B Code 123 Cathedral (1935)

Philco 89B Code 123 Cathedral (1935)

This Philco 89B series 5 is a later version of one of Philco's longest running and most successful cathedral radios. Sometimes referred to as the "baby grand." By 1935 Philco had it right. The electronics are very well refined. The tuning is spot on all across the dial B/C and S/W. Receiver sensitivity is very good. The sound is rich and full and is better than many consoles. The finish on this radio is possibly the slickest I have ever done. It is absolutely gorgeous. The sides are actually a little darker than in my photos and match the front perfectly. As with all my Philcos, I removed both the electrolytic and the tar caps and stuffed them with new ones to maintain original look and performance. New resistors as necessary and a full alignment. A few minor veneer repairs and a new grille cloth. Unfortunately the chassis and cabinet labels are pretty much toast. Beyond that, if you buy this radio, you will have one of the nicest examples of the Philco model 89B around. $400.00. (1680023)

 

RCA 100 Mini-Cathedral

RCA 100 Mini-Cathedral

This fairly rare little RCA mini cathedral is a real standout among the early 1930s depression era, low budget radios produced to appeal to the thinner wallets of the day. The front is ornate and attractive. With features like shortwave, Superhet, and a tone control switch, it is more advanced than many four tube mini cathedrals of its day. Receiver sensitivity is quite good on the AM band. The chassis restoration was performed by a previous owner and seems well done. I chose to preserve the original finish despite a couple of mars on one side. The set appears original except for the round filter capacitor on the chassis. There is a tiny chip in the small knob that does not show because it is on the bottom. I had to do one tiny veneer repair on the front. I am not a professional photographer. The original finish is actually very nice and the radio appears better in person than in my photographs. It has the ornate Rosette knobs featured on the later production models. I am proud to offer this little set for what I think is a very competitive price. $300.00. (1680017)

 

Stewart-Warner 1231 "Troubadour" (1933)

Stewart-Warner 1231 "Troubadour" (1933)

Here's a nifty little Stewart-Warner 1231 "Troubadour" from 1933. Stewart-Warner must have been selling these things by the pound because this little gem is built like a tank. Quite heavy for its size, it is very well designed, stoutly constructed, and quite attractive. The restoration was done by a previous owner. I touched up the finish and put six coats of nitrocellulose lacquer on it. The knobs were not correct so I made new ones out of black walnut. It has one small crack in the veneer on the front and one small blotch on the lower left side, but presents very nicely. The actual shade is a little darker than my photographs. I replaced all of the resistors and capacitors that hadn't been already, put in a good set of tubes and gave it a full alignment. I removed the miserable antenna volume control and replaced it with much superior audio stage volume control. The receiver is fairly good for a four tuber. The speaker is larger than many radios of this size and it is a pretty good sounding little set. Priced to sell! 11-1/2"H x 9"W x 7"D, shipping weight 16 pounds. $279.00. (1680027)

 

Tunette Mantel Radio (1933)

Tunette Mantel Radio (1933)

Aside from being downright adorable, this little guy has to hold the title of the most lonesome radio in the world. The best I can tell, it is the only surviving radio of this brand in existence. The brand name and model were stamped on the back cover in ink and most of it is no longer readable. It is also apparently the only TRF receiver ever manufactured with this tube complement. The cabinet has a few minor dings but is all in all very nice. This is a very stout, well-made little radio with a cabinet of solid wood. New grille cloth. A full set of very good tubes. All new resistors and capacitors, and a full alignment. Reception is fairly good for a 1933 budget TRF, and the sound is not bad for a little mantel radio. If you are the kind of person who would like to own the only one in the world, this is your radio. I think it would be great if someone would give this lonely little fellow a good home. If you have any knowledge about this radio or the company that made it would you please contact me. 12"W x 8"H x 6"D. $249.00. (1680028)

 

Wurlitzer 2700 Juke Box (1964)

Wurlitzer 2700 Juke Box (1964)

If you want to warm up some great memories from the 50s and 60s, I've got just the heater for you. Check out this 1964 Wurlitzer model 2700 jukebox. This baby plays a whopping 200 selections of 45rpm records. It comes complete with 100 45rpm records in a mix of country and old rock 'n roll. New, period appropriate labels are installed. The unit is in decent cosmetic condition, but has a certain amount of road rash from years of service. I polished all the aluminum and chrome trim to what I think is an acceptable presentation. I have completely cleaned, lubricated and repaired the mechanism and it operates very reliably. The photos provided are just shop photos. Interested parties should request more photos via email. I removed the unreliable, unobtainum, hugely expensive special jukebox tubes and modified the chassis to accept comparable, inexpensive more available types. I have been playing it in my workshop for a year or so, but it takes up too much space. I am offering it for what I think is a very good price. Yellow Freight Lines estimated approximately $350 shipping to a residence. $1,500.00. (1680020)

 

Zenith 5D011Z Consoltone (1946)

Zenith 5D011Z Consoltone (1946)

Offered for sale is a nifty little Zenith Consoltone 5D011Z table radio from 1946. This is a really swell little set with surprisingly good sound and decent reception on its internal antenna. The cabinet is in very nice condition, with all original knobs and grille cloth. It has been fully recapped and resistors as needed, and fully aligned. The only thing not original is the power indicator lens, which I had to fabricate, as none were available. The sound is surprisingly rich for a small table set, hence the name "Consoltone." You won't regret owning this little gem. It doesn't take up much space on the counter top and will keep you entertained in the kitchen, just as it did for Mom and Dad, after he got home from the second "war to end all wars." $159.00. (1680006)
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